Author Topic: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye  (Read 21084 times)

Icy

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A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« on: February 13, 2015, 07:52:43 AM »
Over the past year, there has been a huge influx of new players, and naturally, many of them have lots of questions about how to speedrun Goldeneye and optimize their gameplay. The community has been very helpful in teaching and mentoring the newbies, but there hasn't been a go-to place to learn about all the basics. I'll cover a lot of the essentials in exhaustive fashion, but if you have any suggestions on how to improve this, please let me know!

A Brief Introduction to Goldeneye

Long before speedrunning was a modern and popular hobby, The Elite had been pushing the limits of the game and has continued to do so all the way back since the late 90s to today. With this in mind, new players have to realize and accept that the world records and even times worth points are very good compared to a lot of speedrunning games, such that it can be intimidating at first. Goldeneye optimized to the level it has been makes becoming a good player very hard.

Fortunately, Goldeneye is a fairly simple game overall and the sprinty nature of playing the levels allows for tons of attempts. The Elite also has extremely good historical documentation, tons of videos, and an active community if you ever need help or have specific questions not addressed in this guide.

If you want to achieve good times in this game, you have to be pretty dedicated, talented, and hard-working, but because of the difficulty, it can be incredibly rewarding. Just remember to have fun and enjoy the ride!

Getting Started

Before even playing the game, knowing about a few settings and preferences is important. To start off, the most popular and recommended controller style is 1.2, "Solitare", which uses the C-buttons to move and the controller stick to look around. The reason it's used is because how fast you move with the stick is based on how far you push it, whereas using buttons ensures you're always moving at maximum speed. Straferunning (moving forward while strafing) is significantly faster than simply moving forward, and 1.2 makes this as easy as possible.

Some players use 1.1 but "cruise control" their controller stick. Cruise control is when you set the neutral position of the controller stick to the bottom, so that when it's resting in the middle, the game interprets that as forward, and thus, holding forward gives you maximum speed. This is considered more difficult and less recommended, but it's still possible to achieve respectable times with it, and some players including Goose and Wouter have done so.

In Goldeneye (and also Perfect Dark), you experience a "running boost" after about 3.5 seconds of holding forward, which increases your speed by about 1.33x. You maintain this speed by most actions, except for letting go of forward, pressing aim, and pausing. In other words, make sure you're always holding forward and moving at maximum speed unless necessary to save time in another way. This is another reason why 1.2 is superior to 1.1.

Next is how you actually hold the controller. Because there are six buttons on the right side of the controller, holding the C-buttons while also pressing A and B is difficult, and you'll slow down trying to quickly reach and press them. To overcome this, most players use the "alien finger" or "keyboard" controller grip styles, allowing them to be moving at full speed, while also having access to all the controls. These are uncomfortable and difficult to use at first, but with some practice and time, they'll feel more natural. See here for more details on different controller grip styles.

Auto-aim is also commonly used, but is generally level-dependent. Having auto-aim on allows you to fire at guards without needing to adjust your movement, but some levels are better with it off to have more control of your aim and get headshots. Keep it on most of the time.

Finally, there are three video settings: Full, Wide, and Cinema. There's been some debate over the years on which to use, but ultimately any differences are negligible. Full allows for a larger resolution, Cinema allows for greater peripheral vision, and Wide is in-between. A few levels require specific ones, such as Dam Agent using Full, but otherwise, choose whichever you prefer.

Rankings and Point System

http://rankings.the-elite.net/

One of the big draws to The Elite is how well organized and designed the rankings are. On the rankings site, you'll find the latest records, the WR table for all 60 levels, rankings of all the players, a search feature to view the WRs on any date, each player's record table, videos for each significant time, and tons more. I strongly recommend spending some time getting acquainted with the rankings, watch some amazing WR runs, and look into some of the history of the levels.

To cover a few basics of the way The Elite ranks players, a point system is used, which rewards 1st place with 100 points, 2nd place with 97 points, 3rd place with 95 points, and then one less point all the way down to 97th with 1 point. Because Goldeneye speedruns use the in-game timer which only counts seconds, you'll find that there are tons of ties for each time, even for WRs, so there are clumps of point distributions. For example, Dam Agent 0:53 is the WR, giving 100 points to 57 players, meaning that everyone with Dam Agent 0:54 is tied in 58th place, rewarding 40 points.

Getting a good ranking in Goldeneye requires great times on most if not all of the levels, so reaching a high rank is a long journey that can even take years. Of course, a high ranking is not the be-all and end-all, as a player with a low ranking but several WRs is still well-respected. With this in mind though, if you're interested in getting a good rank, it's recommended to get the best times you can possibly get on each level before moving on, because as time goes on while you're doing other levels, your records may be beaten and you'll lose points. WRs and other high-ranked records stand the test of time significantly better.

The Basics

Now for some details on actually playing levels! While each level is different, there are some basics to every level that you'll need to learn to do well.

The most important part of speedrunning is your movement and control, or as The Elite calls, your "OCB" (Overall Control of Bond). Ideally as you are running through the levels, you want to cut the corners as tightly as possible and keep your turns minimal, as opposed to making wide turns and adding unnecessary distance from where you are to where you want to go. Here's a simple visual example of bad lines, good lines, and optimal lines:



The left image is going very wide around each corner and losing a lot of time by needlessly going a longer distance to the destination. The middle image is better, but not perfect. As you're adjusting your lines after a turn, you may "wiggle" a little to get on the perfect line, but these slight turning adjustments cost time. The right image is optimal, by cutting the corners as sharply as possible and turning immediately to the next point. You should visualize moving through a level as a long game of connect the dots, where each dot is a corner, wall, or other obstacle. The tighter you get perfect lines and sharp turns, the better your times will be.

Keep in mind that because straferunning is used, it's often better to maintain a left strafe or a right strafe, rather than switching between the two. Switching from left to right takes a little bit of time to de-accelerate and then re-accelerate in the other direction. If you're unsure of which direction you should be strafing on each line, watch some videos of WRs and other high-ranking times.

The next most important mechanic is "lookdown". As Goldeneye uses the internal in-game timer and the N64 is a fairly old console, rendering the level and objects can cause extra lag, costing some time. Learning to play the levels while looking downward (and sometimes upward), is an important technique to getting good times. Many levels are fine with a little bit of look up (say, 30 degrees upward) to aid your movement, whereas others like Archives Agent and Bunker 2 Agent use almost full lookdown. Watch WR videos and get a feel for lag to learn how far down you should look in each level, and practice getting perfect lines while also looking downward.

Another technique used in many levels, particularly ones with sliding doors is "warping". When a lot of lag is occurring in the game, Bond will be treated as having essentially no size. With this, you can sneak through small cracks, so long as there is enough space to occupy Bond on the other side. So instead of waiting for doors to open or maneuvering around guards, warping is used to help save time. This is most commonly done by switching weapons to create lag, or by getting shot by other guards. Here is an example of an excellent warp, and as you see, it's almost as if the door isn't even there!

The final basic in all levels is guard boosting. In Goldeneye, getting shot pushes you by quite a bit, and this along with straferunning allows for faster speeds. Getting shot from behind is a "boost" and saves approximately 0.3s, whereas getting shot from the front is a "backboost" and costs approximately 0.3s. It's luck-based on what guards will do, so if you're getting backboosted in a run, you may need to restart and hope for better luck. Players commonly refer to runs as an X:Y ratio on how many boosts they got. For example, a run with 2 boosts and 1 backboost is a 2:1 run. Ideally, you want a ton of boosts (without dying), and minimal or zero backboosts. You can also "self-boost" in some levels using Grenades, Remote Mines, boxes, and other explosives.

Choosing a Level

With 20 maps and 3 difficulties, giving a total of 60 individual levels, there is a lot to speedrun to get a good ranking in Goldeneye. Of course, you can start off wherever you want, but if your interest is improvement in speedrunning and increasing your OCB, there are several "beginner levels" you should play first. Levels like Control and Aztec are very complex, whereas Runway and Surface 2 are much simpler, and to become a good player, learning the basics step-by-step is the best way to go.

If you're completely new to speedrunning, or really like to build up slowly, I suggest playing Runway Agent and without the use of Grenade self-boosting. The level consists of a few lines, some quick turns, one door, one long line, and perhaps a drone boost or two, giving the very raw basics of speedrunning Goldeneye. Without the use of Grenades, it's possible to get 0:24, and there's a lot of leeway that you don't need a perfect run to get 0:24. Here's a demonstration of what your run should look like as you get better. If you can achieve 0:24 without the use of Grenades, you can try to add Grenade self-boosts to get 0:23, or move on to another basic level.

Once you're more confident in your movement and have a basic OCB level, some good beginner levels and times to go for are Dam Agent 0:54, Runway Agent 0:23, Bunker 1 Agent 0:18, and Archives Agent 0:17.

Dam Agent requires some good movement, the use of lookdown and lookup, a fast shot on the lock on the gate, and some luck with getting a fast opening gate and/or guard boosts. It's an excellent level when going for your first points. For more details on the level, see Wodahs' tutorial on obtaining 0:53 and 0:54.

Runway Agent has some quick and sharp movement, and requires self-boosting with Grenades. The WR strat is to volley multiple Grenades in the air to chain several boosts, but when starting off, it's much easier to prime a Grenade in your hand, and to time dropping it at your feet as it explodes. I suggest doing the latter when going for 0:23.

Bunker 1 Agent 0:18 is somewhat complex, but is a short level. It involves some luck by guards boosting you, nailing a good warp at the end, some decent movement, and some patience. As many levels in Goldeneye are luck-based, Bunker 1 Agent is a good introduction to learning to grind and building your mental and emotional skills with being patient. You'll certainly need it in the future for more complex and difficult levels.

Archives Agent is simple and doesn't have much luck, but is quite technical and involves some slick movement and quickly opening doors. Achieving 0:17 is a good sign that your movement is growing and that you're on your way to becoming a good speedrunner.

Some Intermediate Techniques

There are a few techniques that are beyond basics, but are commonly used. The first is "2.X" or the use of a 2-controller control style. Goldeneye has a minor glitch in that you can use the second controller during opening cutscenes, which allows you to fire, open doors, and build acceleration before even starting the level. You can think of 2.X as providing a boost, which saves approximately 0.3s. There are also two types of use of 2.X: automatic and manual. Automatic 2.X is by just using one controller, and having the other cruise controlled in one direction and held with a rubber band, so that you gain the benefits of 2.X without actually using the other controller. Manual 2.X is using one controller in each hand, necessary for some levels.

An excellent starter level for 2.X is Streets Agent with a goal time of 1:14. You can play with 2.X and set the second controller to cruise control so that you're automatically straferunning to the right. This means you can play with a single controller, but gain 0.3s. Another great starter level for 2.X is Caverns Agent with a goal time of 1:04. Similar to Streets Agent, you can cruise control the controller, and during the opening cutscene, press B on the second one to open the lift door immediately to save time. Manual 2.X is considered more of an advanced skill, so by the time you should be using it, you'll already by adept with the game.

Another useful technique is using a "dot". Since the game doesn't naturally have a crosshair without aiming, it's difficult to be precise with your shots, so many players attach a small dot of tape to their TVs, or make a mark with a sharpie, acting as a pseudo-crosshair. Having a dot is essential to levels with precise shooting, such as Surface 1 Agent, and Bunker 1 Secret Agent.

One more useful technique is abusing a glitch with throwing Mines and Grenades. When you throw a Mine or Grenade while not looking in the direction of the object, they ignore walls, other objects, and most other things in their paths, essentially letting players throw them through anything. The best introductory level to this technique is Surface 2 Agent, where achieving a good time involves throwing the Remote Mine towards where the radio is, and quickly turning away to let it travel through the walls, saving lots of time.

Other Common Questions

What are the differences between NTSC, PAL, and JAP?

For the most part, they're all the same, but handle lag differently and doors opening at different speeds. In general, NTSC is very slightly faster in almost every level, but PAL is advantageous for Train, Jungle, and Aztec by having better lag control. PAL can also fire some weapons slightly faster (Watch Laser, AR33), and has slightly less aggressive AI. JAP and NTSC are essentially the same, except JAP has all Body Armors in each level, stronger auto-aim, and guards are slightly more aggressive. JAP is commonly used for levels that are difficult to survive, or make use of the better auto-aim including Caverns 00 Agent, Silo 00 Agent, and Control 00 Agent.

Here is a thread detailing the extensive differences for each version and how to acquire them:
https://forums.the-elite.net/index.php?topic=21748.msg444293#msg444293

What's an untied WR?

Simply put, an untied WR is a WR that is not tied. Because of the high optimization of the games and the number of skilled players, an untied WR is extremely difficult to achieve. At this point nearly two decades later, very few new untieds are possible and only a small handful remain. It's always a special moment when one is achieved!

What is TNS?

TNS, or "Time Not Saved" is a glitch where if an objective in a level completes/fails in the final frame of the fade out of a level, the level is treated as completed, but skips the ending cutscene and does not save the time if it was a new record. The Elite accepts TNS runs as records. Common levels where TNS occurs is Frigate where the hostages escape in the last frame possible, and Facility when you exit the level on the first frame Trev's speech completes the objective.

What is LTK/DLTK?

LTK/DLTK or (Dark) License to Kill, is a side league compared to normal mode and is a special challenge that makes use of the 007 Mode custom settings. LTK maximizes enemy damage, accuracy, and reaction speed, while minimizing health, providing a difficult challenge for players. DLTK is the same but also maximizes enemy health. Under these settings, guards rarely miss, react instantly, one hit kill you in most cases, and requires 10 headshots or equivalent to kill.

Providing Proof

As it's the year 2015 and technology is amazing, it's pretty simple to record your gameplay to share and provide proof of the times you achieve. The Elite requires video proof of any significant time to ensure players are actually obtaining the times they claim to have and to make sure nobody is cheating. The rankings system is very user friendly with helping you share proof. For more details on the proof policy, see here.

Closing

Hopefully this guide answers questions and provides the first step for new players interested in speedrunning Goldeneye! If you ever want to know more, always be sure to check out video on the rankings page, ask questions with the community, and study the levels! Enjoy your time here!



Beginner's Guide to LTK
https://forums.the-elite.net/index.php?topic=20276.msg421466#msg421466



How to Improve: A General Guide to Getting Better
https://forums.the-elite.net/index.php?topic=22334.msg451774#msg451774


« Last Edit: February 10, 2018, 06:45:45 PM by Grav »

TheFlash

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2015, 11:27:20 AM »
This type of document is definitely a candidate for the Info tab on the rankings.  A more general FAQ document would be great too.

Qwezzo

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2015, 11:37:14 AM »
Great post Icy hopefully this gets pinned, if people ask me in my stream where to start I'll definitely point them towards this. I'll tweet this out as well.

Alec M.

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2015, 02:39:09 AM »
This is an excellent, well-constructed post, Icy. Good on you for providing this for the newer players out there. Can't wait to get passed by all the newbies on the rankings!  :nesquik:
"Train smarter, not harder" -Mike O'Hearn
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N E S Q U I K B O Y Z

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2015, 09:44:34 PM »
 :nesquik:Thanks, Icy :nesquik:

007

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2016, 03:56:17 AM »
I appreciate the time you took to type all this juicy information!  It's a great article and really helps me as a new member to understand the basics to even the utmost efficient strategies.  Thankyou very much Icy. :alien:
*  "Low IQs should not argue with intellectuals that have real life experience and success.  It's painful...".
* People that rely on Google are uneducated and will wither away in the Dark ages.

The_Juicy_Moose

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2016, 10:54:02 AM »
I've read this thread many times but to piggy back off Decipher it helps a lot, thanks Icy for putting a detailed tut together!  :grin:
"A good speech should be like a woman's skirt: long enough to cover the subject and short enough to create interest." - Winston Churchill

Qwezzo

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Alec M.

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2017, 10:44:29 AM »
Posting Icy's "Auto-Aim Strength: A Visual Guide" in here because I think it could be useful for new players viewing this topic, while not having to sticky another topic.  :kappa:

"Most people go by feel with how strong auto-aim is on each version and difficulty, so here's an image of each of them. I tested this using Invisibility, no guard idle animations, and cropped the last frame before the auto-aim turned off to get the maximum strength. However, even with this setup, Bond can adjust left and right even with just pressing C-Up, and also wobbles his aim (great game, right? :nesquik:), so the positioning is mildly different, but this should still be pretty good.

Jap A:


NTSC A:


Jap SA:


Jap LTK:


NTSC LTK:


NTSC SA:


Jap 00A:


NTSC 00A:
"
"Train smarter, not harder" -Mike O'Hearn
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SputnicK

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #9 on: September 08, 2017, 07:29:09 PM »
I've played Goldeneye for over a decade, and accumatively for thousands of hours. With that said, I've never even considered speedrunning the game until I found this community, which appears to be very active in it. I plan to use this guide to help me improve; thanks @Icy for providing it!  :)

WGJC3107

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2018, 04:40:54 AM »
Thank the lord for this post. Never played GE and I had no idea on how to get faster. Thanks so much! :rollin:

PJplum

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #11 on: September 15, 2018, 05:05:11 AM »
Hello good people.

I've recently brought out the n64 dusted it off and put he and pd back in

Back when I played I only used 1.1 and am trying now to learn 1.2 with disastrous results. I can't get the hang of what fingers to use for the c buttons. I keep slipping or end up with a thumb stuck over them all. I also can't press b consistently.

I've read the bit above above how to hold it but is there a more in depth tutorial with video etc

Slugg Christ

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #12 on: September 15, 2018, 09:01:10 AM »
Hello good people.

I've recently brought out the n64 dusted it off and put he and pd back in

Back when I played I only used 1.1 and am trying now to learn 1.2 with disastrous results. I can't get the hang of what fingers to use for the c buttons. I keep slipping or end up with a thumb stuck over them all. I also can't press b consistently.

I've read the bit above above how to hold it but is there a more in depth tutorial with video etc
I don't believe that anybody has made a video tutorial on how to hold your controller lol.
https://forums.the-elite.net/index.php?topic=19709.0

For Keyboard, use your pinky for C-right, ring finger for C-up, and middle finger for C-left. Index is for A/B/ Start.
The most common control style and the most comfortable.
Most notable drawback is that this style puts the R/L buttons fairly out reach, making it difficult to use strats such as R-Lean and the Egypt door crouch strat, which I use vanilla grip for.

Alien finger is pretty simple, just lay your right index finger over the C-buttons & use your thumb for A/B/Start.
Much less comfortable, and likely to cause arteritis, but does allow for much easier access to the shoulder buttons.

Understand that either will take some getting used to. I would recommend grinding an easy strafing level like Dam A or Streets to get used to whichever you choose.

Good luck.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2018, 09:10:03 AM by Slugg Christ »

Alka Maass

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #13 on: September 15, 2018, 09:10:59 AM »
Hello good people.

I've recently brought out the n64 dusted it off and put he and pd back in

Back when I played I only used 1.1 and am trying now to learn 1.2 with disastrous results. I can't get the hang of what fingers to use for the c buttons. I keep slipping or end up with a thumb stuck over them all. I also can't press b consistently.

I've read the bit above above how to hold it but is there a more in depth tutorial with video etc
in a stream karl said he learned to do 1.2 ages ago by doing combat simulator in PD a ton, worth a try

also I'd like to add for keyboard grip I use my right hand index finger for start and sometimes I use my right hand thumb for A

mw

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #14 on: September 15, 2018, 10:12:24 AM »
Alien finger is pretty simple, just lay your right index finger over the C-buttons & use your thumb for A/B/Start.
Much less comfortable, and likely to cause arteritis, but does allow for much easier access to the shoulder buttons.
You got this backwards. Thumb goes on the C buttons and index for A/B (and I personally use left thumb for start). Also, it's much more comfortable.  :v
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PJplum

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #15 on: September 16, 2018, 06:27:43 AM »
Thanks guys.
I guess my real problem is I'm left handed. I don't have the dexterity (pun intended) in the outer fingers of my left hand.

I don't suppose they made left handed controllers?

Slugg Christ

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #16 on: September 16, 2018, 08:14:28 AM »
Thanks guys.
I guess my real problem is I'm left handed. I don't have the dexterity (pun intended) in the outer fingers of my left hand.

I don't suppose they made left handed controllers?
You could always try Spec style in the link I posted earlier. Strafe with D-pad, and use the other hand for the buttons/stick.

Whiteted

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #17 on: September 16, 2018, 09:27:38 AM »
By left handed you mean you want your right thumb on the stick? Because that's me but it still seems weird to call it left handed.

I found rubber-banding c-up and then doing spec-style only for left or right works for a good few levels. Using the d-pad for forwards too seems very tricky to me, you will shift slightly and find that somehow you're running sideways instead of diagonally. Perhaps it just takes practise but while you have the level itself to learn it's just another problem!

Or play 2.2

MadmanFlechr

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #18 on: September 16, 2018, 03:56:09 PM »
Alternatively, just get used to it lol

I'm left-handed and have never had any issues playing keyboard (which I do with middle finger on C-Up and just my thumb for A/B/Start, there are multiple ways to do keyboard style).
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SGT RAGEQUIT

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #19 on: September 16, 2018, 03:56:24 PM »
i think spec shoves paper or something under the d-pad so harder to accidentally press/unpress a direction

spec BFR player

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #20 on: September 16, 2018, 11:27:35 PM »
I've always calibrated the D-pad with pieces of paper, yes. I think for goldeneye my D-up is over-sensitive (so it doesnt fail on me when holding up+left / up+right), but it's been ages since I needed to open it, and of course it's all personal preference.
For strafing with the D-pad, I have no issues at all. Being one piece of plastic instead of 4 separate ones is different, but it works normally. And the alien finger grip is just lovely!
Speedrun Times
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Whiteted

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #21 on: September 17, 2018, 12:38:37 PM »
Thanks I'll try that myself

PJplum

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #22 on: September 18, 2018, 02:43:27 AM »
Sorry I'll clarify. I'm happy to use left hand on stick. But I can't use my right pinky finger due to nerve damage and I just struggle in general with ring finger too.
Ideally what I was hoping existed was a controller with c buttons on left hand side

Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #23 on: September 18, 2018, 04:28:40 AM »
You could attempt to master the upside down grip, that'd put the C buttons on the left and gain you high respect from your peers.

iriebutler

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #24 on: September 18, 2018, 03:14:12 PM »
Wait, you want your left hand on the stick, and your right hand on the c buttons on the left?
It doesn't sound like there's anything stopping you from alien grip
*Inventor of thumb condoms*

Slugg Christ

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #25 on: September 18, 2018, 04:19:57 PM »
You could attempt to master the upside down grip, that'd put the C buttons on the left and gain you high respect from your peers.
:rollin:

Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #26 on: September 18, 2018, 05:14:50 PM »
The grip I use is left thumb on stick, left index on Z, then right index on C Up and C Right. My right thumb covers A, B, and C Left and I can use either thumb to pause. There may be more comfortable grips but I get good button access and don't use any of your fingers you say you don't want to use except to grip the controller. I may experiment with sawing off the right grip entirely to see if it makes it easier.

Keep in mind that C Left will override C Right, so keeping right strafe held down 99% of the time is fine. You can go just C Up with the tip of your right index easily as well as switch to left by using your right thumb on C Left in addition to right strafing. A + B are pretty easy with the side of your thumb as well.

Alec M.

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Re: A Beginner's Guide to Speedrunning Goldeneye
« Reply #27 on: September 21, 2018, 12:24:05 AM »
^ Sounds very unorthodox and unreliable for long grinds tbh.

I use classic Boss Keyboard style. I use left thumb on analog, left index on Z, right pinky on C-Right, right ring on C-Up, right middle on C-Left/C-Down, right index for A/B/Start, and right thumb to hook into grip for stability. 
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