Author Topic: Favorite Work of Literature  (Read 664 times)

Ignominious Sin

  • Posts: 119
  • Still Gold.
Favorite Work of Literature
« on: March 11, 2018, 11:29:52 AM »
Fiction or Nonfiction

- For Whom the Bell Tolls
- Infinite Jest
- Sound and the Fury
- The Trial

With the average IQ around here being 150+. I'm sure some good reads will be mentioned.

« Last Edit: March 11, 2018, 02:10:11 PM by Ignominious Sin »
The elite as we know it is done. I'm emailing my people. Enjoy a dead forum.

setrackthebossdog

  • Posts: 52
    • GE
    • PD
    • twitch
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2018, 11:57:47 AM »
harry potter! havent you noticed how much it mirrors reality with the good teenagers (young leftist groups such as antifa) having to rise up against the forces of evil (drumpf and the nazis)?

Guado

  • Posts: 111
    • 1080 Champ
    • GE
    • PD
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2018, 11:55:13 AM »
East of Eden - John Steinbeck
 This was a summer reading assignment back in 2007, but it's one of the few that was good.
I didn't want it to be over. It resonated strongly with me, since I had just finished working my what-would- be final summer as a farmhand. The character Samuel Hamilton was such a strong parallel to my boss and uncle that summer. Both characters were these larger-than-life people that you'd count yourself lucky to have as friends. And the rest of the story was good too. I can't write much my phone is at 8%.

Also Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne. That book will turn to dust by the end of my lifespan. It'll be held together by duct tape in a few years, for damn sure.
Joining the MOC. Didn't do too well, ah this scene ain't really my thing. Peace ~

Ignominious Sin

  • Posts: 119
  • Still Gold.
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2018, 01:05:23 PM »
East of Eden - John Steinbeck
 This was a summer reading assignment back in 2007, but it's one of the few that was good.
I didn't want it to be over. It resonated strongly with me, since I had just finished working my what-would- be final summer as a farmhand. The character Samuel Hamilton was such a strong parallel to my boss and uncle that summer. Both characters were these larger-than-life people that you'd count yourself lucky to have as friends. And the rest of the story was good too. I can't write much my phone is at 8%.

Also Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne. That book will turn to dust by the end of my lifespan. It'll be held together by duct tape in a few years, for damn sure.

You'd like On the Road if you haven't read it already. Also I definitely prefer East of Eden over Grapes of Wraith.
The elite as we know it is done. I'm emailing my people. Enjoy a dead forum.

JDBlack21

  • Posts: 116
  • Josh Schwarz
    • GE
    • twitch
    • YouTube page
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2018, 03:19:55 PM »
I read some interesting plays for my English Class
-Death of a Salesman
-Master Harold and the Boys
-The Glass Menagerie

All three filled with intriguing symbolism relating to memory and social issues in society.

TheFlash

  • Posts: 2650
    • twitch
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2018, 03:41:11 PM »
It's tough to say. I'm not big on having favorites.  I would have been more likely to give this considerable thought if it was in General rather than FFA.

There is something very special about the class of works that have been carefully crafted with multiple layers and a great deal of meaning.  It seems like most of those are from the past.

Ignominious Sin

  • Posts: 119
  • Still Gold.
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2018, 04:10:16 PM »
It's tough to say. I'm not big on having favorites.  I would have been more likely to give this considerable thought if it was in General rather than FFA.

There is something very special about the class of works that have been carefully crafted with multiple layers and a great deal of meaning.  It seems like most of those are from the past.

Absolutely. Animal Farm is a prime example.
The elite as we know it is done. I'm emailing my people. Enjoy a dead forum.

Shadow

  • Posts: 1193
  • The American Shadow
    • GE
    • PD
    • 2017SilverStar
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2018, 06:22:51 PM »
I'm probably overthinking this, but do you mean works of literature in the broader or narrower sense? For example, I'm not sure I would have classified Verne (or even Animal Farm) as literature.

Even so, I have a very hard time answering this. I like different works for different reasons and I don't know that I could pick a favourite. I'd say just about anything by Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, or Hugo are very enjoyable for me as insight into the human condition and emotionally impactful.

I liked some of Steinbeck (Mice and Men was good and East of Eden superb but Grapes of Wrath was garbage).

One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest and Flowers for Algernon were both excellent.

Not a fan of For Whom the Bell Tolls or Farewell to Arms since I really don't care for Hemingway's style, but I did like his Old Man and the Sea (where the style particularly worked well).

Less "literary," Jane Austen, Verne, and Dumas are favourites.

I don't like Kafka.

This rambling seems woefully inadquate to capture my feelings or my favourites :(

Ignominious Sin

  • Posts: 119
  • Still Gold.
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2018, 06:29:11 PM »
I'm probably overthinking this, but do you mean works of literature in the broader or narrower sense? For example, I'm not sure I would have classified Verne (or even Animal Farm) as literature.

Even so, I have a very hard time answering this. I like different works for different reasons and I don't know that I could pick a favourite. I'd say just about anything by Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, or Hugo are very enjoyable for me as insight into the human condition and emotionally impactful.

I liked some of Steinbeck (Mice and Men was good and East of Eden superb but Grapes of Wrath was garbage).

One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest and Flowers for Algernon were both excellent.

Not a fan of For Whom the Bell Tolls or Farewell to Arms since I really don't care for Hemingway's style, but I did like his Old Man and the Sea (where the style particularly worked well).

Less "literary," Jane Austen, Verne, and Dumas are favourites.

I don't like Kafka.

This rambling seems woefully inadquate to capture my feelings or my favourites :(

How about Voltaire? And i was going to include Old Man and the Sea, as I just recently re-wrote an analysis of it.
The symbolism of Christ is well done.
I'd Also recommend Lolita if youre into the Russian style.
The elite as we know it is done. I'm emailing my people. Enjoy a dead forum.

Shadow

  • Posts: 1193
  • The American Shadow
    • GE
    • PD
    • 2017SilverStar
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2018, 09:17:30 PM »
I've read excerpts of Voltaire and doubt his writings are something I'd enjoy, although I've read quite a bit of 16th and 17th century writings (mostly of a theological nature).

I might look into Lolita, but I don't have much respect for much of post-1900 literature and it has to be really well-regarded if I'm going to touch it. I've got too much on my list of books to read :)

Guado

  • Posts: 111
    • 1080 Champ
    • GE
    • PD
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #10 on: March 12, 2018, 10:57:08 PM »
A Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich (by idk I'm going to work now) really shaped the way I look at work. To add to that, it's a way of looking at life as even if my physical being is trapped in a situation and my mind must be carefully controlled to avoid negative body language, my spirit is free to find comfort in anything.
Joining the MOC. Didn't do too well, ah this scene ain't really my thing. Peace ~

AZ

  • Posts: 5710
    • AxZ
    • 2015CommunityContributor
    • 2017SilverStar
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #11 on: March 13, 2018, 05:28:20 AM »
Some of my favorite books (nonfiction) are featured in my avatar ;)

Shadow

  • Posts: 1193
  • The American Shadow
    • GE
    • PD
    • 2017SilverStar
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #12 on: March 13, 2018, 09:25:10 AM »
Some of my favorite books (nonfiction) are featured in my avatar ;)

Why do you like to read such tiny, blurry books?

spec BFR player

  • Posts: 1199
  • what up
    • Spec
    • GE
    • PD
    • twitch
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #13 on: March 13, 2018, 05:17:44 PM »
kinda liked catcher in the rye, and 1984 was pretty good
Speedrun Times
Chat highlights not embed so that forums don't get clogged:
http://i.imgur.com/HPNYJKM.png
http://i.imgur.com/jDB72Q1.png

"Part of what makes a shitpost good is that it contains Truth."

Ignominious Sin

  • Posts: 119
  • Still Gold.
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #14 on: March 13, 2018, 05:22:37 PM »
kinda liked catcher in the rye, and 1984 was pretty good

Catcher in the Rye was my favorite book. It made me really pretentious for a while though. I let it get in my head, and started thinking everyone was a "phony"
The elite as we know it is done. I'm emailing my people. Enjoy a dead forum.

Elite Top 5s

  • Posts: 6328
  • Zero-Time P.O.M.
    • Luke
    • GE
    • PD
    • twitch
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #15 on: March 13, 2018, 05:28:58 PM »
Axel is referring to the ***1001/101/501/51/XXXX ___ to ___ before you die*** series
LAS

#TeamLevelRotation

TheFlash

  • Posts: 2650
    • twitch
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #16 on: March 14, 2018, 05:00:39 PM »
Okay, look.

There is now a similar thread in General and while considering what I was currently reading I started to experience fond memories of what must be my favorite work of literature.

I think this one counts both as "any kind of booklike thing" and "literature". It's definitely deliberate rather than a puffball.  A great deal of work was done in a very unique style.

I rarely have a favorite of anything and usually the top tier is just a giant ball I can't pick apart....

But The Baroque Cycle by Neal Stephenson must be on top for me.

This is so unbelievably huge. It's eight books originally released in three volumes at around 3500 total pages. I have those but I've only ever read it in the set of 7 audiobooks that total up to over 114 hours of listening time.  It's so enjoyable that I've only listened to it at 1x speed.  I'm pretty sure I've finished the entire thing three times.

It was incredibly hard to get into the first book and I had no idea what I was getting myself into.  By the time I got to Book 2 I was totally hooked.

This is something very.....special.  I haven't really done much review-hunting online but I'm pretty sure it will be very divisive. Many people will want absolutely nothing to do with it. Others will read most or all of it and still hate it.  Then there will be certain people who like it very much.

If you've read other items from Neal Stephenson, you won't be too surprised here.  It's got all of his standard pointless detours and odd inclusions.  For once, you probably won't be able to complain too much about the ending, though.  He's also done some form mixing by including sections of letter writing, script (as for a play), cryptography, history, and more.

If you've never touched anything from Stephenson, this might not be the best place to start.  I think it is best enjoyed after you already understand his style and idiosyncracies.  With the wrong perspective, you'll probably think they ruin the book and are nothing more than mad ramblings.  But for me, it's the opposite, and the special style adds a lot of value.

The core components include: late 17th/early 18th century historical/science fiction, economics, government, mathematics, cryptography, slavery, navigation, and even a little bit of alchemy.  If you're not already interested in most of those, you may find sections of this unbearable. Just a warning.  Like I said, it will probably be a love/hate kind of situation.

If anyone wants to make a serious effort at this, I highly recommend starting with Book 2, King of the Vagabonds. This is basically a pirate adventure plus a love story.  It's an incredibly fun ride and sets up most of what is to come.  If you enjoy Book 2, you can back up to Book 1 afterward and then move on to Book 3.  Later books must be done in order but I don't think Book 2 has many dependencies on Book 1.  In print format, Books 1-3 are usually found sold together in one volume, Quicksilver.  You would just skip to "Book 2" within that volume.  The audiobook versions have these split into three separate items.

My Discord name is in honor of one of the main characters in this series, Eliza.  You'll find her in Book 2.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2018, 05:18:56 PM by TheFlash »

Ignominious Sin

  • Posts: 119
  • Still Gold.
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #17 on: March 14, 2018, 05:06:48 PM »
Flash you said earlier you're not big into favorites and now you've decided you have one. That's awesome. Clearly it impacted you deeply. I'll look into it
The elite as we know it is done. I'm emailing my people. Enjoy a dead forum.

Shadow

  • Posts: 1193
  • The American Shadow
    • GE
    • PD
    • 2017SilverStar
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #18 on: March 14, 2018, 09:25:24 PM »
I didn't really care for either Catcher in the Rye or Clockwork Orange, which both seemed the same type of genre to me. I didn't really go through that stage though so probably just didn't relate.

Scott,
I've read Anathem, The Diamond Age, and Snow Crash. I have several other of Stephenson's books and Baroque Cycle is on my list to get to eventually.
I find Stephenson fascinating, but my overall impression has been that he has a fantastic idea, really fleshes it out well, and then completely loses interest about halfway through the book. His endings have been particularly weak for me, but obviously he hits the right points with a lot of people. I've always been more of a fantasy guy and haven't touched much Sci-fi, but now that I feel I've sufficiently explored the fantasy works out there, I'm starting to branch into it a bit more.

Funky_Buddha

  • Posts: 151
  • ...with hook and scourge...
    • GE
    • PD
    • twitch
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #19 on: March 15, 2018, 01:42:06 AM »
The Savage Detectives by Roberto Bolano is comfortably my favourite work of fiction. For want of a better description, I suppose it falls into Shadows line of "very enjoyable for me as insight into the human condition and emotionally impactful." He can change your whole mood/outlook in the space of a paragraph.

mw

  • Posts: 118
    • GE
    • PD
    • twitch
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #20 on: March 15, 2018, 01:18:15 PM »
Never been much of a book guy, but my favorite short story is "The Touch of Nutmeg Makes It" by John Collier. The only decent place I can find to read it online (unless you have a New Yorker subsription and want to go back in the archives) is here. (ctrl+f - "a dozen big")

It's not a terribly complex story but I like the way it's written.
PD Proof Moderator

Ignominious Sin

  • Posts: 119
  • Still Gold.
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #21 on: March 15, 2018, 03:54:25 PM »
I've wanted to Read The Fountainhead. And I agree about Atlas. I appreciate it for being a masterpiece. But you couldn't pay me to read it again.
The elite as we know it is done. I'm emailing my people. Enjoy a dead forum.

AZ

  • Posts: 5710
    • AxZ
    • 2015CommunityContributor
    • 2017SilverStar
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #22 on: March 15, 2018, 05:21:26 PM »
Thanks for reminding me of The Fountainhead; was thinking of what I would read once I finish A Tale of Two Cities.

Shadow

  • Posts: 1193
  • The American Shadow
    • GE
    • PD
    • 2017SilverStar
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #23 on: March 15, 2018, 05:54:08 PM »
Thanks for reminding me of The Fountainhead; was thinking of what I would read once I finish A Tale of Two Cities.

If you haven't read Les Miserables, it's a masterpiece in observing the human condition.

Ignominious Sin

  • Posts: 119
  • Still Gold.
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #24 on: March 15, 2018, 05:56:00 PM »
Thanks for reminding me of The Fountainhead; was thinking of what I would read once I finish A Tale of Two Cities.

If you haven't read Les Miserables, it's a masterpiece in observing the human condition.
People say that of The Grapes of Wraith (ugh)
The elite as we know it is done. I'm emailing my people. Enjoy a dead forum.

Shadow

  • Posts: 1193
  • The American Shadow
    • GE
    • PD
    • 2017SilverStar
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #25 on: March 15, 2018, 07:25:54 PM »
This is what I had to say about Grapes of Wrath:
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1674942121

Ignominious Sin

  • Posts: 119
  • Still Gold.
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #26 on: March 15, 2018, 07:31:44 PM »
This is what I had to say about Grapes of Wrath:
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1674942121

Well written. A little biased though no?
The elite as we know it is done. I'm emailing my people. Enjoy a dead forum.

Shadow

  • Posts: 1193
  • The American Shadow
    • GE
    • PD
    • 2017SilverStar
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #27 on: March 15, 2018, 07:38:29 PM »
I never pretended to be otherwise  :v
My "reviews" are very subjective. These are my thoughts and my feelings and I don't pretend everyone will (or should) feel the same way I do.

However, I'm curious what specific bias you're speaking about, negative yes, but I'm not sure what the specific bias is.

Ignominious Sin

  • Posts: 119
  • Still Gold.
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #28 on: March 15, 2018, 07:55:33 PM »
I never pretended to be otherwise  :v
My "reviews" are very subjective. These are my thoughts and my feelings and I don't pretend everyone will (or should) feel the same way I do.

However, I'm curious what specific bias you're speaking about, negative yes, but I'm not sure what the specific bias is.

Well obviously from your review you stated that Steinbeck believed "Okies" were dumb and subhuman. Though the Joad's were uneducated. I dont believe he created them in his vision of all people from Oklahoma. And you being from OKC.. etc etc.

I'm exhausted right now so im sorry if that wasn't coherent.
The elite as we know it is done. I'm emailing my people. Enjoy a dead forum.

Ignominious Sin

  • Posts: 119
  • Still Gold.
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #29 on: March 15, 2018, 08:16:55 PM »
I also have heard of "Saint Katy the Virgin" by Steinbeck. I know little about it, but it was mentioned in an episode of my favorite tv show of all time Fraiser.
The elite as we know it is done. I'm emailing my people. Enjoy a dead forum.

Shadow

  • Posts: 1193
  • The American Shadow
    • GE
    • PD
    • 2017SilverStar
Re: Favorite Work of Literature
« Reply #30 on: March 15, 2018, 08:45:33 PM »
Hmm, maybe. I currently live in OKC but I certainly didn't grow up in Oklahoma so I'm not sure I'm biased in that direction. However, I do think it's a fairly legitimate criticism that he portrayed them all (not just the Joads) as pretty incompetent. To be fair, he was at least more sympathetic toward them than most Californians.